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March 2016

Launch Admissions FAQs

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Congratulations on applying to MIT Launch! Whether you are waiting on your admissions decision or trying to decide whether to accept, we understand you have many questions, and we’re here to help! Please see below for the most commonly asked questions. Don’t see your question below? Check out the MIT Launch
website for more FAQs.

 

First, a couple of logistics:

 

  • All regular round admissions decisions, including deferrals, will be announced by April 15, 2016.
  • Applications are still being reviewed until decisions are sent.  

 

 

Q: Can I change my application once I’ve submitted it?

A: Applications cannot be changed once they have been submitted. ONLY if you become aware that the link to your video does not work, or there is another part of your application that is incomplete, may you email info@launchsummer.org.  

 

Q: My friends have received interview requests but I have not. Does that mean I have been denied?

A: Interviews are offered on a rolling basis as applications are reviewed.  There is not any specific order to when applications are reviewed during the review period, and interviews may still be offered until late in the process.  

 

Q: I have received an interview and I am trying to set up a time on SimplyBook.Me. Are the times offered in my time zone?

A: All interview times are shown by default in Eastern Standard Time (EST). Please review your schedule and plan accordingly.

Continue reading “Launch Admissions FAQs”

International Students: Applying for a Visa?!

So you’ve been accepted to MIT Launch. First of all, congratulations! You’re in for one crazy summer. But now, if you’re from outside the US you’re probably going to have to start thinking of logistics, and most of all getting a visa.

ciara

I’m Ciara and I was a student in the Launch Class of 2015. As I am from Ireland, I am allowed to freely enter the United States without a visa for tourist purposes, but as MIT Launch wasn’t exactly a holiday, I wasn’t sure if that would cover it. I did a bit of research and came up with two options:

Business Visa (B-1)

After considering all my options I ended up applying and getting a business visa. This covers you to enter the United States for temporary business purposes, with the maximum duration of your stay being 6 months. As Launch can technically be considered a business incubator this visa will permit you to attend the program. Personally I think this is the best option for most people as, depending on where you are from it can be valid for up to 10 years. This means if your Launch company takes off (which hopefully it will) you will be able to return to the USA for business trips, conferences etc. using this visa for the next ten years before you will have to renew it.

To get this visa you will likely need a letter of acceptance for Launch (which I got emailed to me and printed myself) and the address in which you will be staying for the duration of your time in Boston (I just gave the address of MIT Campus). However I would recommend you consult the US embassy or consul in your country to get more detailed instructions.

Tourist Visa (B-2)

By considering Launch as a summer program rather than a business incubator it could be possible to use a tourist visa to enter the country. I personally would see this as a less reliable option due to the fact that the length of your stay is determined by the Department of Homeland Security upon your entry to the United States, so it adds an extra variable to the equation. Also, if you ever want to return to the US for business purposes, this visa will not permit your entry.

If you already have a B-2 visa and would like to use this for Launch, I’d advise you again consult the US embassy or consul in your country to get more guidance from them.

 

So that’s my tips for you! And once you get your visa you can concentrate on what’s important – getting super excited for the summer of a lifetime you are about to experience!

Who teaches at MIT Launch?

We’re gearing up for another exhilarating summer at MIT Launch, and a question we often hear is, “Who teaches the lectures?”

First, we try to avoid the term “lectures,” since our classroom sessions provide so much more than the traditional one-directional lecture.  Our sessions range from interactive case discussions, to activities and simulations, to entrepreneur panels and speakers.  The first week is a bit heavier with time in the classroom to lay some foundational groundwork, plus form teams and ideas.  Past the first week, classroom sessions are only held in the mornings.  Afternoons are a more open format for teams to work on their businesses – interviewing customers, prototyping, meeting with their mentors or having a mock board of directors meeting, doing competitive analysis, and more!

Our innovative teaching format requires great instructors to match.  Several of the courses are taught by MIT Launch staff, with guest lecturers of MIT and HBS professors, new and established entrepreneurs, and industry experts.  Here’s a tiny preview of what is to come this summer:

Continue reading “Who teaches at MIT Launch?”

Is MIT Launch Worth It?

By: Nate Friedman

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If this post title appealed to you, you’re among the applicants or admits (or parents or teachers) who has asked whether or not Launch is worth the cost, time, and giving up other opportunities of what else you might do during the summer.  I almost turned down my offer to attend Launch, and want to share with you my story.

My Background: Before attending Launch, I was working on a company that I was passionate about, and considered turning down the offer to attend Launch.  My dad, who is also an entrepreneur, challenged the idea of attending Launch.  “Maybe you really don’t need this program; you can get a desk at an innovation center and really start working.”  The combination of making progress with a business that I was passionate about plus following the advice of my father made the alternative to Launch tempting.  

Starting A Company “The Right Way”:  My oldest brother, who was about to graduate from Harvard Business School, offered a different perspective, even in light of my exciting alternative. He told me, “you need to go to this program.  You need to learn how to start a company the right way. You have been trying for years to get a real company off the ground and Launch will help you with a real framework, an abridged version of what I learned in business school, plus give you a network and community of like-minded peers – best friends – for life.”

In the past, I have started companies by drafting up a business plan and designing a logo. Starting a company is an impressive thing to do in high school, but starting it the right way and really fixing a problem – that’s special – and people in the startup world, colleges, and especially you will know the difference. This is the significance of Launch. You may hear about young people starting companies in high school, but Launch alumni know how to use a specific framework to launch (hehe) their ideas and really solve the problem that their company is addressing, plus will be able to do it repeatably over time.

Why My Brother Was Right: It was really hard to turn down my father’s advice, but I’m grateful that I was guided and supported in making the choice that I did.  I talk to my friends from Launch, at least one, every single day. We spent a month together and that was enough time to guarantee best friends for life. You may not believe that now, but Launchies have each others’ backs and that’s what my brother alluded to. He also mentioned what might seem like the obvious, but a resume boost. Attending MIT Launch and starting a company – not bad for a month’s time.  Let me finish this section with this, my brother knew I could do all that and have fun.  We all will get different things out of Launch, make different mistakes, experience different success, but we will all grow as entrepreneurs and people, and have an unforgettable summer that bonds us for life.

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